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tions attractive enough to carry out a malicious act, with no intention of entering the building.


Countermeasure Considerations • Extend your event security coverage to re-deploy personnel outside the venue to ensure any barriers set up to manage the egress are not compromised.  positioned at and near the exit points to detect and/or respond to suspicious behavior exhibited by persons who are observing exiting patrons.


• Extend the assignments of your K-9 vapor detecting teams to be patrolling the periphery of the venue for potential threat ac- tors carrying or wearing explo- sive devices. • Ensure that the exterior perim- eter plan developed by you and law enforcement extends from your venue to adjacent mass transit stations such as trains or subways.


protest or similar gathering assembles, thereby potentially impeding   - lowed to escalate, will heighten the anxiety of the crowd who must now pass through or around the protest. Close contact and taunting may also occur, which increases the possibility of civil disorder.


   With explosives set-back standards often requiring no vehicular       assumption is that no vehicle can gain entrance within the  measure at many venues, but not all. Does your venue present an opportunity for a vehicle to drive through a crowd of patrons moving in mass either entering or exiting the venue? As we have sadly seen at recent events in the U.S. and internationally, the de- termined attacker may resort to driving at a high rate of speed into a crowd, capitalizing on their vulnerability when outside the venue.


“This copycat mentality is, and will continue to be, a concern for those of us who have the responsibility to create and maintain a safe and secure environment at venues. Additionally, the lone wolf that we fear will target our venues may be driven to committing destructive acts due to mental illness. These attacks, as we have sadly witnessed in recent history, have been committed by individuals who planned and executed their deadly attacks with no apparent association or allegiance to hate or extremist groups.”


Countermeasure considerations • Keep informed on demonstration permits. Be sure the authorities know where you are prepared to allow a protest. Otherwise, a location  • Have your exterior CCTV monitor the protest. This allows real-time responses should it become necessary, and might also serve as needed evidence to a distur- bance. The protesters will re- cord their event. Don’t let that be the only documentation. • Barricades such as bicycle       a permitted protest zone. Once a permitted protest has been scheduled, coordinating in ad- vance with law enforcement on the source of the barricades is important. Wrongly assuming this detail has been covered is potentially a big problem.


Training & Exercises      current training to address your exterior concerns. There are many options. Crowd manage- ment equates to crowd safety. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has en- dorsed IAVM’s Trained Crowd Manager program. Both your 


management should complete this training. Exercises, both table-tops and full-scale exercises, are some of the


Countermeasure Considerations • Survey the walkways connecting to your venue to determine if ver- tical posts known as bollards are positioned in a pattern that prevents a passenger vehicle from accessing the sidewalks from a street. Fixed  - lards are a good choice for back of the house locations such as loading docks. • Coordinate with law enforcement counterparts to determine where large vehicles such as trucks or buses may be parked to temporarily block vehicle access on event day.


This is not about impeding anyone’s First Amendment right to free speech. A lawful demonstra- tion with the properly obtained permits are generally not the concern. They are known to public safety and venue management. Agreements are made on when and where the demonstration will take place. A situation that can negatively impact your venue is when an impromptu


        - ness. Participating in an on-site exercise with all stakeholders is criti- cal. Attending conference-organized exercises hosted by industry and collegiate organizations such as IAVM/AVSS, NCS4, CEFMA, and CAOS helps you better prepare for the unexpected.


Call to Action The exterior of your venue should not be dismissed as “somebody else’s problem.” Plan, prepare, collaborate, and exercise as much as reasonably possible. Lead by example and insist that your outer perim-  especially your patrons. FM


Mark Camillo is a retired US Secret Service agent, has been directly involved since 2007 with AVSS as a board chair and currently as an academy instructor. Mark serves as a Senior Vice President with Contemporary Services Corporation, and is an adjunct professor at the CUNY-John Jay College of Criminal Justice located in New York City.


IAVM 13


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