search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
The single most important key to a harmonious community is - communication, communication, communication. A board should inform homeowners when a reserve study is being conducted, and why. It is to protect their investment in their homes. The results of the study should be summarized into an Executive Summary (included by most reserve study providers) and distributed to current and future owners. An Executive Summary lays out what’s happening with the reserve funds and justifies why setting money aside is necessary. When large projects are looming, property managers, through the board, should educate homeowners on what they should expect (disruption to their daily lives), and the end result of specific capital replacements in terms of enhanced property value and appearance of the community. An informed homeowner is one who understands board decisions and can more easily support them.


Recommended Reserve Funding Graph


          leadership decisions. A properly funded association is likely maintained in excellent condition. Additionally, maintaining a property in excellent condition increases curb appeal and homeowner satisfaction, ultimately making the association a more desirable one to be a part of. The result is a harmonious community between all current and future members.


www.cai-illinois.org • 847.301.7505 | 23


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60