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FODDER, continued from Page 5 gional clubs that make up the SABGA. As chairman of the club, he at the time automatically served on the nine-member SABGA Board. Conrad has been the facilitator, working with U.S. breeders to formalize the agreement with the SABGA and Stud Book SA (two very separate entities of which the latter is almost semi-state and con- trolled by the Animal Improvement Act State Law of SA) and the Al- liance. The Alliance will be responsible for bringing South African judges to the U.S. to inspect potential nominees for the Stud Book. The first round of American judges have already done their first two courses in South Africa and will be used as interim inspectors with certain powers to nominate animals for preliminary entry, until such time as South African judges arrive (post-Covid) to endorse their


selections. Training courses and events/shows are planned. In South Africa, the Savanna, Kalahari Red and Boer goat fall under the SABGA. The Savanna and Kalahari Red are clubs under the association. They in general are referred to as the Boer goat when speaking about any of the three breeds. In the U.S., the Alliance is the only legal representative of the three breeds that will be allowed by the South African Stud Book and the South African Animal Improvement Association (SASBAIA) to have animals formally registered into the SA Stud Book register. What does this mean for U.S. breeders? It means that if you have a top-quality Boer, Kalahari Red or Sa- vanna sire/dam and it passes inspection by a South African judge, they can be entered into the South African Stud Book. If you have a red


November 2021 | Goat Rancher


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