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RAMBLINGS, continued from Page 5


scribers, we can promote information to our 10,000+ Facebook followers. We use every tool available to help our advertisers and our Boer and meat goat in- dustry. Lastly, we are a family-owned business. You can call me or my daughter and talk to us about your marketing plans, e-mail us a photo of your grandkids, or have us look up that recipe you saw 6 months ago. We’re part of your com- munity and appreciate your support. Social media can’t tell you that.” I thought that was a perfect reply. Sometimes it seems the whole world is looking at Facebook, but that doesn’t mean they are looking at your news feed or sale page. Many sales are not advertising in Goat Rancher and rely solely on social media. When they do that, I just wonder how many people they are missing — those who aren’t friends or followers of theirs, those who avoid Facebook and Twitter, and those who are distracted by thousands of other people’s posts. As Dad has said many times, sometimes you just need to get that one special buyer to your sale — and chances are he’s a Goat Rancher reader. You don’t want to miss him. The cost of a Goat Rancher ad is well worth it to get him there. I agree social media has a role. We use it every day. But we don’t rely on it for 100% of our marketing. We still use the telephone, face-to-face meetings, e- mail, and yes, ads in the Goat Rancher. Successful marketing requires every tool in your toolbox — including the time-tested and well-worn magazine. n


Goats seized from nuclear activist Connecticut authorities have seized dozens of goats from the home of a longtime environmental ac- tivist in response to citizen complaints and surveil- lance that revealed animal welfare concerns. The Associated Press reported that state and local


officials executed a search and seizure warrant at the home of Nancy Burton, the founder of the Connecticut Coalition Against Millstone, a watchdog group that has been critical of the Millstone nuclear power com- plex in Waterford, Conn., for the past two decades. Officials’ concerns included mobility issues due to untrimmed hooves, excessive manure, lack of suf- ficient water, and structures in poor condition that did not provide adequate protection from the weather. Burton accused officials of taking the 65 goats not because of neglect, but to stop her testing of goat milk for radioactive materials linked to nuclear power plants. n


April 2021 | Goat Rancher


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