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Figure 1. This screenshot shows the daily budget table screen. As the soil water content gets near the point where the plant will see water stress, the lines change from green (good) to yellow (warning) and then to red when the model estimates that the plant is water stressed. The Edit button is used to add irrigation amounts or a soil moisture measurement to correct the model on that date. Selecting the date gives more model information.


Figure 2. This screenshot shows the soil water chart. The estimated soil water content is plotted in relation to the field capacity, the management allowable deficit (point where the tree or vine will begin to see water stress) and the wilting point (point where the tree or vine dies). Also plotted are irrigation and rainfall events. All of these increase with a growing root zone.


For an irrigation scheduling tool to actually be worth using by growers, it must be simple and intuitive.


With this tool, growers can be better informed about how much water needs to be applied and when, in order to maximize their yields and conserve water resources.


16 Irrigation TODAY | April 2019


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