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Community Spotlight: Providence Point (a 55+ Community)


Rob Guyott and Patrick Rooney


Location: Issaquah, Washington Year formed: 1984 Number of homes: 1,008


Community composition: All Condominiums. (Largest in Washington State)


Resident composition (primary home, second home, etc.): Primary homes for 55+ members. 98% are age 55 Or older. The average age is 78.


Professional or self-managed: Self Managed by a Board of Directors and dedicated team of professional employees lead by a General Manager with CMCA®, AMS®, and PCAM® designations.


Number of board members: The master association is known as “Providence Point Umbrella Association.” There are nine Directors. One elected director from each of five village associations and two elected directors from two large village associations. There is also a President, VP, Secretary, Asst. Secretary, Treasurer and Asst. Treasurer. Each village association has its own board of Directors.


What makes your community a great place to live? The official motto of Providence Point is “A Great Place to Really Live.” Providence Point is designed to provide quality of life opportunities for active adults. From educational opportunities in our Communiversity programs that include everything from Art to Zumba classes and our nature trails in a 160 plus acre community with a park and natural area setting. Many of our owners are retired professionals representing a broad spectrum of life and business experiences.


What is special about your community? No doubt it’s the residents. We have approximately 1,400 people living in Providence Point. Our seniors have a wealth of life experiences that enrich the community by sharing those experiences through their volunteerism.


28 Community Associations Journal | April 2017


What challenges do you face now? The first generation of owners has reached a point in their lives that has created aging in place issues that have become prevalent. Fortunately, the Providence Point Foundation was formed in 2015 and has taken the lead on providing resources to assist owners. New owners are younger and still working. We are rethinking how we engage new volunteers for director positions and committees. Owners in their 50’s and 60’s are tech savvy but many older residents are not in the community. We have to start building communication tools on multiple platforms.


What is your community’s greatest success? The community has been in existence for the past 33 years. It was created with the purpose of creating a better quality of life for seniors. Our surveys tell us owners truly love it at Providence Point. This is our community’s greatest achievement.


What methods does your community use to communicate? We use email, a monthly newsletter, mailings, and we have an in-house TV channel. We need to start to develop use of current media technology outlets such as Facebook and Twitter.


How does your community foster resident participation? While we are a large condominium community we have seven separate village association communities that make the living experience at Providence Point feel very personal and close. Volunteers come from person to person recruitment efforts within this framework.


Does your community hold any social events? If so, what are they? We have an Activities Department that plans events for the community. There are many Association sponsored events such as the annual 4th of July street celebration with live music, village association Christmas parties, monthly catered & themed dinners including use of outside food trucks, monthly happy hour events, live plays, BBQ’s and dances.


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