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CUISINE


Bobby Flay was the roundabout inspiration for this goat meat dish


One of the things that is happening dur- ing our local “Shelter in Place” decree is that we’ve been watching more TV…initially this was to keep abreast of the pandemic, but now more because we’re staying around home more than usual.


I’m not a huge fan of what’s offered via our satellite dish — I can count on one hand the number of programs we watch on a reg- ular basis. And with sporting events off the viewing menu, there isn’t much we bother to tune in.


However, one evening I had three bas- kets of clean laundry to fold and decided to watch TV while I got it all sorted, folded and put away. The only thing of interest that I found after channel surfing was an episode of Beat Bobby Flay on the Food Network. For those unfamiliar with this program, a lesser known chef challenges chef Bobby


Flay to a competition involving a dish des- ignated by the guest chef and judged in a blind taste-test by three other food profes- sionals. The challenging chef declared that the dish to be prepared would be picadillo, a dish that originated in Cuba. Since I wasn’t familiar with what that was, I decided to watch and see how it was prepared. Picadillo consists of ground meat, spices, raisins and a few vegetables cooked and served over rice, topped by a fried egg. The guest chef used ground beef as the main ingredient while Bobby Flay used ground beef and chorizo sausage in his dish. As the show continued, I decided that it would be worthwhile to come up with a goat picadillo recipe — after all, Cuba is part of the Caribbean and likely depends on goat to be a major source of meat for this dish. According to Google, as of 3/19/2019


BY SUZANNE STEMME


there have been 236 episodes of Beat Bobby Flay aired on the Food Network, and Chef Flay has won 155 of those challenges. This time he once again got the judges’ stamp of approval for his culinary efforts. Turns out that this is a really delicious way to use ground goat, and my recipe made enough to serve 4-6 adults. I served it with a strawberry/goat cheese/spinach salad and a dessert of spice cupcakes. Give it a try!


Goat Picadillo 1 lb. ground goat meat


1 lb. ground breakfast sausage (hot or mild) 1 onion, chopped 1 green pepper, chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped


6 oz. Spanish olives with pimento, cut in half 4 oz. raisins 3 bay leaves


8 oz. can tomato sauce 1 cup beef or vegetable broth ¼ cup capers, drained Salt and pepper to taste*


In a deep skillet or Dutch oven, sauté ground goat, ground sausage, onion, green pepper, and garlic until meat is no longer pink and vegetables are softened. Add tomato sauce, broth, capers, raisins and bay leaves. Simmer uncovered for 45 minutes to an hour until moist but not soupy. Prepare rice. Before serving the picadillo, remove and discard bay leaves and correct seasonings. During last few minutes of simmering the picadillo, fry an egg just until set and the yolk is still runny. In a bowl place the rice on the bottom, then a scoop of picadillo, then the fried egg. May be garnished with chopped cilantro and/or chopped green onions.


* Spanish olives and capers are both salty— be careful to taste first before adding ad- ditional salt to the mixture.


(Suzanne Stemme lives with her hus-


band, Dr. Kraig Stemme, DVM, in Alba, Texas. The Stemmes raise Kiko breeding stock at Lake Fork Kikos. You can reach Su- zanne via their website: www.lakeforkki- kos.com.)


46 Goat Rancher | May 2020


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