search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
their communities, independents can leverage this need by investing time and resources to enhance their role as a local grocer. While the pandemic has changed grocery shopping and the industry, the competitive nature will remain, and the more grocers can differentiate themselves in the marketplace – finding ways to attract and retain customers in a way that national chain retailers or e-commerce retailers cannot – will give independents the ability to win in the marketplace.


Selling to Supermarkets


Tapping into a new market isn’t always easy. “A lot of grocers, especially the big chains, go direct to equipment manufacturers,” Wasserstrom says. “As a dealer, that can put a strain on our relationship with manufacturers.” But there are ways to break into the segment.


For dealers and distributors looking to get into the grocery market, Wasserstrom recommends they highlight their foodservice expertise. “A regional chain


with a restaurant in a supermarket here in Columbus has struggled because they don’t have the mindset to run a restaurant,” Wasserstrom says.


The market is in a period of flux. Grocers don’t know what comes next, but if dealers can help them solve problems – hand- washing stations for store entrances or hand-sanitizing stations inside; refrigerated lockers or storage solutions for pickup/ delivery orders; PPE and supplies to weather states reopening; food warming or refrigerated merchandisers for meal kits or take-home meals – they’ll have an “in.”


Finally, dealers should do what they do best – build relationships. “Our members are always looking for ways to support their communities,” says NGA’s Laura Strange. “Get to know local store owners and partner with them on community projects. Attend the NGA Show next year; we’re hoping to have more equipment providers on the floor so members can see what’s new, where they can find more efficiencies, and how they can improve their customers’ experience and differentiate themselves.”


COVID-19 Challenges Top priorities identified by retail and restaurant executives include:


86 percent Employee Compensation and Safety 67 percent Implementing BOPIS (buy-online-pick-up-in-store) improvements 62 percent Shifting HQ to work at home


Other key findings of the study include:


83 percent of C-level executives feel that retail and dining will be changed forever


65 percent of retailers and restaurant chains plan to reopen all their locations and 25 percent plan to open a portion of their locations


56 percent of C-level executives feel that the pandemic will permanently change the way people shop and that most consumers will move exclusively to BOPIS or buy-online-pick-up-at-curbside (BOPAC) shopping


59 percent of companies reported moderate to complete disruption of their supply chain


Source: Cambridge Retail Advisors 28 FEDA News & Views


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68