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WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT


The landscape management program includes 17 specific competencies that apprentices will learn.” Among others, these competencies include how to


renovate, seed and sod lawns using tools and equipment safely; how to program automatic manual watering sched- ules as specified; how to apply fertilizers as directed; and how to read, analyze and measure job sites or blueprints and make necessary mathematical calculations. The program includes 2,000 hours of prescriptive on-the-job training combined with 144 hours of classroom


instruction. It will allow those who participate the oppor- tunity to earn college credit upon completion. In terms of qualifications, apprenticeship participants must be at least 16 years of age, have a high school diploma or equivalent (or working to complete high school), have reliable transportation, and be physically able to perform the work. Of course, participants must also meet the individual requirements of the companies they work for, which may include alcohol or drug testing or the ability to earn a commercial driver’s license. Beyond that, it’s im- portant that participants are serious about advancing their careers in the industry as this is a significant commitment. “It’s a big commitment but one that will set participants


up for career advancement,” says Myers. The enhanced skills and knowledge that come with


participating in an apprenticeship have also been shown to lead to higher wages and, of course, national creden- tials by becoming a “certified apprentice,” a credential that is recognized from coast to coast.


APPRENTICESHIP’S ADVANTAGES


Myers says employers who identify participants to become apprentices are showing a commitment to that individual in helping them grow—and that can be beneficial to both parties.


Workforce Development continues on p.20 2


Carolyn Renick with the U.S. Department of Labor shares information about apprenticeships with the attendees at NALP’s Workforce Development and Recruitment Summit. Learn more about NALP’s program at www.landscapeprofessionals.org/apprenticeship.


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LANDSCAPE PROFESSIONALS 19


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